It’s been a while..

326th Feb 2011Development, Real Studio, , , , , , , , ,

It’s been a while since I posted anything.  Things have been a bit hectic lately.  At the beginning of February I picked up a big contract which could change the direction of CyphersTECH completely.

So far all is going as planned, but I’m putting in a lot more hours than I had anticipated (I’ve slept maybe 6 hours in the last two days).  The estimate is still fine, I’m just working my butt off on meeting the spec.  At any rate, everything else has been put on hold, including my full-time job as I took three months unpaid leave.  Once this project is done, that should free up time for me to get back on GraffitiSuite and get the new site up and running.  I’m excited to see how well it performs after launch.

I know many of my readers are small-business owners, freelancers, or consultants, so my question is this: what is the most effective way you’ve found to research methods for project completion in software development?  Specifically, I’m currently working on merging two products for a company and the code is a bit hard to follow in some areas.  Right now I’m having to jump from module to class to module to window to see how an operation is carried out.  Am I missing some obvious way of tracing all of this that doesn’t require stepping through all of the code?

3 Comments Comments Feed

  1. Bob keeney (February 26, 2011, 2:01 pm). Reply

    OPC (other peoples code) projects are always tough. I find they run into two types: spaghetti code and obfuscation types. Essentially you’re doing it as best you can. Hopefully you had the chance to look at code before bidding.

    • Anthony G. Cyphers (February 26, 2011, 6:31 pm). Reply

      Thanks, Bob.

      I certainly did have a chance to look at the code before bidding, and I felt (and feel) confident that I’ll whip it. Sometimes, however, following other people’s logic for a task isn’t the easiest. Why they do something one way, why this method in this object calls a related method that’s hidden in another object, etc. Their code isn’t bad, mind you, just different than I normally work with.

      At any rate, I am enjoying the challenge.

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